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Disabilities

The Canadian Hard of Hearing Association is leading a national consultation process on the Government of Canada’s proposed federal accessibility legislation. This legislation promises to make Canada more accessible and inclusive of persons with disabilities. CHHA, with the help of 18 Canadian disability organizations (http://www.chha.ca/chha/spotlight.php#partners), including ARCH, wants to hear how the proposed federal accessibility legislation can achieve improved accessibility and inclusion of Canadians with disabilities. Continue reading

business2community.com

Jim Quinlan

Some of the next major hurdles for web developers in the near future won’t be exclusive to coming up with the next cutting-edge design or transcendent functional experience, but making sure that the digital equivalents of handrails and wheelchair ramps are properly installed. With 1 out of 5 Americans living with a disability along with a significant portion of the population’s web users getting older, businesses will need to assess whether their offerings are adequately within the reach of consumers with accessibility needs. And while having an accessible website could make for a strong business case, adherence to accessibility may soon be the official law of the web.
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esdc.gc.ca

Canadians, communities and workplaces benefit when everyone can participate equally in everyday life. There has been much progress in making our society more inclusive, but we can do better.

This is why the Government of Canada is committed to developing new planned accessibility legislation to promote equality of opportunity and increase the inclusion and participation of Canadians who have disabilities or functional limitations. Continue reading

The Government of Canada recently launched a consultation process that will inform the development of planned accessibility legislation.

We need your help in reaching as many Canadians as possible who are impacted by a disability, and ensuring that they are heard through our consultation process.  As a stakeholder, you are our most important partner as we work together towards our collective goal of improving the lives of millions of Canadians with a disability. Continue reading

VANCOUVER — The Globe and Mail

Sept. 13, 2016

Two people who were forced to receive injection medications and electroconvulsive therapy while involuntarily detained for mental-health reasons are challenging the constitutional validity of forced psychiatric treatments.

Under British Columbia’s Mental Health Act, a person who is involuntarily detained is deemed to consent to all psychiatric treatment authorized by a director appointed by the health authority. They are presumed to be incapable of giving, refusing or revoking consent to psychiatric treatment, and cannot appoint a substitute decision maker. There is no statutory requirement to assess whether the person is capable of making decisions. Continue reading

thejakartapost.com

Hello Sehat

Like adults, children can also experience mental health problems, which could affect their growth and development.

It is not easy to identify mental health issues in children. Some cases of mental illness in children are genetic.

Parents must understand what kinds of mental illnesses can affect children, as well as the causes and treatment methods, to support their children growing up. Continue reading

Human rights commissions call for nation-wide legislation and greater accountability to ensure rights of persons with disabilities are respected

Download CASHRA Statement

May 30, 2016 – The Canadian Association of Statutory Human Rights Agencies (CASHRA) (1) is calling on all levels of government to enact federal, provincial and territorial legislation to meet Canada’s obligations under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). (2) Continue reading

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

Marvin Ross

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) “has abdicated its mandate for fairness by denying the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) to eligible Canadians with disabilities” and particularly those with psychiatric disabilities according to advocate Lembi Buchanan of Victoria. “It has become virtually impossible for the majority of people living with severe psychiatric illnesses to access the DTC without appealing to the Tax Court of Canada,” she said.

Ms. Buchanan is lobbying the new Liberal government to restore the accountability that was lost during the Harper government. She added in an email that “there has been a slow erosion of fair treatment of taxpayers with disabilities and no one has really paid attention to it. And of course, no one really seems to care.” Continue reading

NEWS RELEASE

ADVANCING INCLUSION FOR 25 YEARS

MANITOBA APRIL 6, 2016 –Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has – Margaret Mead. Twenty-five years ago, a small group of people labelled with an intellectual disability began proving that quote to be true. That group was the beginning of a legacy that would become People First of Canada (PFC). Today, People First of Canada is the national voice of people who have been labelled with an intellectual disability. Continue reading