National Network for Mental Health is commited to people with disabilities

Stigma

Source: highrivertimes.com

By Paul Krajewski

On Jan. 25, it seemed the whole nation was talking about mental health. People posted, tweeted and sent text messages extolling the virtues of psychological and emotional well-being. They openly spoke about the pitfalls of what happens when we fail to address mental health and challenged the stigma. Continue reading

brockpress.com

Joanna Ward

Last year was a rough one. Everything seemed to go wrong. Beloved celebrities died, presidential elections went awry, an entire city was basically wiped off the map and the whole world seemed to be in a downward spiral. 2017 seems like it should to be a better year.

Every year people make resolutions, but research from the University of Scranton suggests that just eight per cent of people actually keep them. Of course, typical resolutions include things like losing weight, spending more time with friends and family and learning a new skill. This year, instead of all of those resolutions doomed to fail, a commitment to mental health and self-care could be at the top of your list. Here are some ways to keep on top of your mental health this year. Continue reading

www.bustle.com

By NICOLE POMARICO, December 29, 2016

This week has been absolutely devastating for Star Wars fans following the death of Carrie Fisher, and just one day later, even more heartbreaking news came with the death of her mother. Legendary actor Debbie Reynolds died at age 84 on Wednesday, and although she might be gone, she has definitely left a legacy behind that will live on — and not just because of her career in entertainment. Reynolds’ dedication to mental health causes is something that isn’t often talked about, but it should be, and hopefully, people will remember that just as they’ll remember her in Singin’ in The Rain. Continue reading

thespec.com

December 22, 2016

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is making a public plea to the provinces to take Ottawa up on its offer to spend more on mental health — even as federal officials were burning up the phone lines behind the scenes to negotiate health funding deals with individual provinces.

In Calgary to talk to business people Wednesday, Trudeau urged mental health advocates to pressure their provincial governments to work with Ottawa on mental health. Continue reading

broadly.vice.com
by Emily Korstanje

When Nadia was 18, her parents took her to a Muslim faith healer who claimed to be able to exorcize her depression.

Throughout her adolescence in Saudi Arabia, Nadia* struggled to find joy in life.

“As time went on, I felt like I couldn’t hold myself together,” Nadia said. “It feels like my life is wasted, because society doesn’t think that I have value, there is so much pressure to be something you are not here.”

Around her 18th birthday, her angst turned into full blown depression. She often felt worthless, suffered from anxiety and at times could barely get out of bed. Nadia knew she needed help and turned to her parents for support. Uneducated about mental illness and extremely superstitious, her parents took her to a religious (also known as faith or traditional) healer to perform an exorcism on her. They believed that she was possessed. Continue reading

theglobeandmail.com

This is part of a series looking at microskills – changes that employees can make to help improve their health and life at work and at home, and employers can make to improve the workplace. The Globe and Mail and Morneau Shepell have created the Employee Recommended Workplace Award to honour companies that put the health and well-being of their employees first. Register your company now at www.employeerecommended.com.

How many of your employees have a mental health challenge?

A common response is, “That’s not my business, so how would I know?” This is partially correct. It’s true that it’s not your role to pry, ask invasive personal health questions or diagnose staff. Continue reading

theglobeandmail.com

LES PERREAUX AND RENATA D’ALIESIO

The mental-health system for treating military personnel and veterans will undergo a sweeping overhaul to better care for them from boot camp through their retirement years, Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan has revealed.

Top-ranking officials in Defence and Veterans Affairs are looking at “creating a new structure that’s going to not just look after the veteran at the end but start with keeping our soldiers healthy when they’re in the military,” Mr. Sajjan said in an interview with The Globe and Mail. Continue reading

www.voice-online.co.uk

There are concerns over the discrimination against black people of African descent by mental health services

THE COUNCIL of Europe’s Race Committee have voiced concerns over the discrimination against black people of African descent by mental health services.

In a report published by the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI), calls have been made for the Government to commit to addressing the racism faced by black people from the UK’s African Caribbean communities, from both mental health services and the police. Continue reading

dailymail.co.uk

By LAUREN INGRAM FOR DAILY MAIL AUSTRALIA

Stefani Caminiti is like many young women her age: she’s studying, working, and planning her wedding to her fiance.

She also has, like more than four million Australians, been diagnosed with a mental illness or behavioural problem.

The 28-year-old from Perth has lived with depression and anxiety for most of her life, but was only officially diagnosed 10 years ago. Continue reading

nowtoronto.com

BY SEAN MINOGUE

The arduous decade between moving out and moving up in life can feature the onset or intensification of mental health issues like anxiety, depression, eating disorders and addiction, as well as many other unwanted behaviours or patterns of thought. Millennials are caught between pressures to get ahead and live well – but sometimes, these goals conflict. Continue reading